Street Art 2014. Only UK.

After a frenetical activity during the previous years, Banksy is slowing down in 2014. There are six works documented, all of them in the UK, and only one in London (!!). One can assume that The Banksy team was preparing for 2015.

Better Out Than In. New York, October 2013.

On 1 October, Banksy began a one-month “show on the streets of New York”, for which he opened a separate website and twitter account. On every day for the rest of the month, he produced one street art piece in different locations.

A pop-up boutique of about 25 spray-art canvases appeared on Fifth Avenue near Central Park on 12 October. Tourists were able to buy Banksy art for just $60 each. In a note posted to his website, the artist wrote: “Please note this was a one-off. The stall will not be there again.” The BBC estimated that the street-stall art pieces could be worth as much as $31,000. The booth was manned by an unknown elderly man who went about four hours before making a sale, yawning and eating lunch as people strolled by without a second glance at the work. Banksy chronicled the surprise sale in a video posted to his website noting, “Yesterday I set up a stall in the park selling 100% authentic original signed Banksy canvases. For $60 each.” Two of the canvasses sold at a July 2014 auction for $214,000. Source: Wikipedia.

Sequence from October 1 to 31:

 

Banksy vs Bristol Museum. June 2009.

“In the summer of 2009 Bristol Museum & Art Gallery was taken over by an extraordinary exhibition of works by the infamous Bristol artist Banksy.  Overnight the museum was transformed into a menagerie of Unnatural History – fishfingers swimming in a gold-fish bowl, hot-dogs and chicken nuggets. Paintings were placed in amongst the historic collections of Old Masters, sculptures and other pieces dotted around throughout the museum displays. The main entrance was transformed into a sculpture hall, accompanied by a burnt out ice-cream van that pumped out an eerie sound-track of warped tunes, whilst a giant ice-cream melted on its roof.

Before long, people queued around the block to get into the exhibition, some as long as seven hours just to be part of this unique phenomenon. Over 100 works by the artist – most of which had not been shown before – were displayed.

Banksy left one sculpture behind. Pictured above is the Angel Bust – or the paint-pot angel which is currently on display at the museum. He also gave another work to the museum of a sculpture of Jerusalem, which was made by another artist called Tawfiq Salsaa – you can see it in our online collection.”  Source: Bristol Museum

The Cans Festival. London, May 2008.

Banksy hosted an exhibition called The Cans Festival in London, over the weekend 3–5 May 2008.  It was situated on Leake Street, a road tunnel formerly used by Eurostar underneath London Waterloo station. Graffiti artists with stencils were invited to join in and paint their own artwork, as long as it did not cover anyone else’s.

Photos: Romany WG and others

Barely Legal – the first big US show. September 2006.

Barely Legal was the third major exhibition after Turf War and Crude Oils. It was held in a warehouse in Los Angeles on the weekend of 16 September 2006. Billed as a “three-day vandalised warehouse extravaganza”. The exhibition featured a live “elephant in a room,” painted in a pink and gold floral wallpaper pattern, which, according to leaflets handed out at the exhibition, was intended to draw attention to the issue of world poverty.  Banksy continues exploring the “modified oils” genre from the previous exhibition “Crude Oils”.

Turf War. London, July 2003.

Opened on July 18 and lasted for three days. Turf War is Banksy’s first major exhibition where he displays a great variety of different techniques and styles. Marks the beginning of a string of brilliant exhibitions with a periodicity of approximately two years. Turf War in 2003, Crude Oils, 2005, Barely Legal, 2006, Banksy vs Bristol Museum 2009, etc. The live cows and sheep are transported from the Somerset farm. There is also a section of “modified oils”, the most prominent being “Suicide bombers just need a hug”. The London art critics call the exhibitions one of the most interesting of the year.

Photos: http://www.artofthestate.co.uk and Benny Goh

Severnshed. Bristol, February 2000.

After moving to London in early 2000, Banksy went back to Bristol in February the same year, where he opened his first regular exhibition in his own name at the restaurant Severnshed, behind the docks. It’s was a mixture of stencil and acrylic. All pieces were priced under £ 1,000. The “Self-portrait” of Banksy,  with a chimp head,  sold for £ 198,000 at Bonhams in 2007. There are two remarkable pieces – “Simple intelligence testing” and “Sharks”.

Photos: Melfleance, Flickr